Discovering Global Socio Economic Trends Hidden in Big Data

Discovering Global Socio Economic Trends Hidden in Big Data

This guest blog post was produced by Giselle Lopez and Wayne St. Amand of Crimson Hexagon. Global Pulse worked with Crimson Hexagon on a project exploring Twitter and Perceptions of Crisis Related Stress. It is part of a series detailing the open innovation process undertaken by Global Pulse and our partners on a number of collaborative “proof of concept” research projects exploring the utility of various new, digital data sources to answer traditional development related questions. Check out the first post from the series, interview with a Global Pulse data scientist for background.

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Data Philanthropy- Patrick Meier

My colleague Robert Kirkpatrick from Global Pulse has been actively promoting the concept of “data philanthropy” within the context of development. Data philanthropy involves companies sharing proprietary datasets for social good. I believe we urgently need big (social) data philanthropy for humanitarian response as well. Disaster-affected communities are increasingly the source of big data, which they generate and share via social media platforms like twitter. Processing this data manually, however, is very time consuming and resource intensive. Indeed, large numbers of digital humanitarian volunteers are often needed to monitor and process user-generated content from disaster-affected communities in near real-time.

I’m just wondering if the Technology sector is moving a lot faster than the Humanitarian sector and what the future holds…

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Future Alarm – Paul Currion

Future Alarm – Paul Currion

The one thing we know for sure about the information revolution is that it disrupts existing business models, and that we have just started to feel that disruption in the humanitarian sector. While it’s difficult to predict exactly how this disruption will play out, it’s increasingly clear that a primary source of that disruption will be increased participation of disaster-affected communities in preparedness, response and recovery; and that this participation will be facilitated by technology.

I’m just wondering if the Technology sector is moving a lot faster than the Humanitarian sector and what the future holds…

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Boxer Hooper apologises for Aboriginal shirt

Boxer Hooper apologises for Aboriginal shirt

Indigenous boxer Damien Hooper has apologised after breaching Olympic rules for wearing a T-shirt featuring the Aboriginal flag into his first London fight. The 20-year-old from Queensland wore the shirt as he walked into the ring for his bout against America’s Marcus Browne.

Hooper won the round of 32 fight 13-11 and said afterwards that the shirt inspired him.

AOC spokesman Damian Kelly says Hooper has apologised and will not be wearing the flag shirt again in London.

He says the IOC will be looking into the incident in due course

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Community Engagement, Ben Comms, Community Communication…it works whatever its called

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Introducing Google Fiber: The Next Chapter of the Internet – YouTube

Looks like a great future. Just wondering how much it will cost to be super connected and also when it will reach Malaysia?

 

via Introducing Google Fiber: The Next Chapter of the Internet – YouTube.

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Olympians Take to Twitter to Protest Social Media Restrictions | Playbook | Wired.com

 

LONDON — Dozens of athletes participating in the 2012 Summer Games posted on Twitter on Sunday night to highlight what they consider unfair restrictions on their social media activity.

RULE #40

Most of the tweets simply read: “I am honored to be an Olympian but, #rule40 #WeDemandChange.” A large number of U.S. Track and Field competitors appeared to post the message in a coordinated way, including medal favorites Sanya Richards-RossBernard LagatTrey Hardee and Dawn Harper. Harper posted a message that included a photo of the defending Olympic 100 meter hurdles champion with her mouth covered by tape reading “Rule 40.”

Olympians Take to Twitter to Protest Social Media Restrictions | Playbook | Wired.com.

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